Le Mis – The Hidden Back Story – Part 7

Sentiment in America was divided over the French Revolution, but those who were there knew there was something amiss. Gouverneur Morris, who was highly instrumental in drafting our Constitution (He headed the Committee of Style which wrote the Constitution and was one of the most active spoken participants at the Philadelphia convention.) was our Diplomat to France at the time of the Revolution. William P. Hoar recorded his views:

On the scene as our Minister in Paris was Gouverneur Morris, the conservative statesman who had been the architect of much of the U.S. Constitution. Morris wrote from France in July 1789 that:

“this country is at present as near to anarchy as society can approach without dissolution…The authority of the King and the nobility is completely subdued, but I tremble for the constitution.”

Gouvernor Morris

Gouvernor Morris
French Ambassador
Founding Father

John Adams of the Revolution predicted as biographer Paige Smith reports:

“from the first moment [Adams] viewed it with misgivings…At the same time he could not forbear to point out ‘that the form of government they¬† have adopted’ could be ‘nothing more than a transient experiment. An obstinate adherence to it’ would involve France in ‘great and lasting calamities’ A single assembly would be dominated by demagogues and the result would be repeated upheavals and disorder- a succession of bloody contentions.”

How prophetic those words became as 80 years of chaos followed the French Revolution.

Meanwhile, as the success of the conspiracy escalated, so did the atrocities and violence.

Jean Paul Marat, a native of Switzerland and an Illuminati, was an aberration of the human race. Under 5 feet tall, a monstrous head, broken nose, skin like yellowed parchment usually wore a ragged coat of faded green and a dirty handkerchief around his head, but struck fear in people around him with his fury at the slightest contradiction.

Jean-Paul Marat1743 to 1793

Jean-Paul Marat
1743 to 1793

Following the fall of the Tuileries, Marat began to incite the population to massacre the Royalists and Swiss who had been imprisoned. To increase the booty, Marat plotted with his supporters and imprisoned a number of wealthy people. All of these victims were jailed without trial.

Ultimately, with the help of thieves and murderers released from prison to aid Marat in the killing, well over 1,000 victims from 9 prisons (many from the common people) were put to death. At a house of corrections for women, 35 perished, including girls 10 to 15 years of age. Among these victims were more than 200 priests. Some saintly men who had spent their lives doing good, white haired with age.

Marat, of course, blamed the people for the assassinations. The truth is the assassins were a group of less than 300 men, most were Marseillaise and released convicts, a few were middle class tradesman.

There is also evidence that a drug was put in the drink distributed to the assassins which created fury and left the partakers without reason. Some witnesses noted that because of the drug, most of the assassins died in misery, with an insatiable thirst, and unable to sleep for weeks. (No relation to Prozak, Zoloft, Paxil and other SSRI’s associated with the violence of mass killers of today BTW. They didn’t have it then.)

Just getting warmed up it seems- See Part 8 of the Hidden Back Story of Le Mis


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